UNION

“We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, clothed in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly affects all indirectly. I can never be what I ought to be until you are what you ought to be, and you can never be what you ought to be until I am what I ought to be. This is the interrelated structure of reality”.—Martin Luther King, Jr.

Theodore Roosevelt said “This country will not be a good place for any of us to live unless we make it a good place for all of us to live in”. History shows us that without Unions and their right to collectively bargain for the betterment of workers the suits would have us working for the same subsistence wages peasants in China and Viet Nam toil under; without health care or safety codes or environmental standards.

The greed motivated neglect visited on workers without a voice and without the power to band together as one will lead us back to the days of Norma Ray Textile Mill sweatshops and the current state of coal miners in Appalachia. Today’s short-sighted profit motivated Republican coup in Michigan, home of the Teamsters that gave America a middle-class, to eviscerate Unions with the Orwellian language of Right to Work is just what Barack Obama said it was; the right to work for less. #The “Economic Bill of Rights”  – Franklin D. Roosevelt #Unions # Justice #China and Viet Nam #American standard of living -1944 State of the Union # Economic Bill of Rights

The “Economic Bill of Rights”  – Franklin D. Roosevelt

Excerpt from 11 January 1944 message to Congress on the State of the Union

It is our duty now to begin to lay the plans and determine the strategy for the winning of a lasting peace and the establishment of an American standard of living higher than ever before known. We cannot be content, no matter how high that general standard of living may be, if some fraction of our people—whether it be one-third or one-fifth or one-tenth—is ill-fed, ill-clothed, ill-housed, and insecure.

This Republic had its beginning, and grew to its present strength, under the protection of certain inalienable political rights—among them the right of free speech, free press, free worship, trial by jury, freedom from unreasonable searches and seizures. They were our rights to life and liberty.

As our nation has grown in size and stature, however—as our industrial economy expanded—these political rights proved inadequate to assure us equality in the pursuit of happiness.

We have come to a clear realization of the fact that true individual freedom cannot exist without economic security and independence. “Necessitous men are not free men.” People who are hungry and out of a job are the stuff of which dictatorships are made.

In our day these economic truths have become accepted as self-evident. We have accepted, so to speak, a second Bill of Rights under which a new basis of security and prosperity can be established for all—regardless of station, race, or creed.

Among these are:

The right to a useful and remunerative job in the industries or shops or farms or mines of the nation;

The right to earn enough to provide adequate food and clothing and recreation;

The right of every farmer to raise and sell his products at a return which will give him and his family a decent living;

The right of every businessman, large and small, to trade in an atmosphere of freedom from unfair competition and domination by monopolies at home or abroad;

The right of every family to a decent home;

The right to adequate medical care and the opportunity to achieve and enjoy good health;

The right to adequate protection from the economic fears of old age, sickness, accident, and unemployment;

The right to a good education.

All of these rights spell security. And after this war is won we must be prepared to move forward, in the implementation of these rights, to new goals of human happiness and well-being.

America’s own rightful place in the world depends in large part upon how fully these and similar rights have been carried into practice for our citizens.

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About circusinpurgatory
Nick Masesso Jr’s fictionalized short stories, poetry and prose have been published in the Starry Night Review, Elegant Thorn Review, Language and Culture.net and Vagabond Press; the Battered Suitcase. His latest book “Armor of Innocence” and first book “Walking the Midway in Purgatory, a Journal” are available on-line and through bookstores.

3 Responses to UNION

  1. James Mcfarland says:

    8.3 rating, well done, no complaints save for a tad more ‘falcon perception’ to top off a nice piece.

  2. Reblogged this on Nick Masesso, Jr..

  3. Nice to read again

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